She Learned to Hear by Seeing

I love this quote from The New York Times story on the late Ida Wyman: Taking pictures enabled me to hear the stories of the people I photographed. Listening is such an integral part of journalism – if we cannot listen it is incredibly difficult to see the stories unfolding in front of us. And […]

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Building a Sense of Place at Woodstock

The New York Times takes a look at the (ahem) three rolls of film Roger Ballen exposed at Woodstock, 50 years ago. This exchange alone makes it worh a read: You’ve said that so much of photography is actually rooted in having experiences and not just sitting behind a camera or computer. Yeah, this is […]

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American Masters: Garry Winogrand

PBS’ American Masters took a look at the life and work of Garry Winogrand and I highly recommend this – it gives a fascinating insight into his street photography and acceptance into the art world. It’s available online through May 17.

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Left in the Cold

Matt Black has spent the last few years working on his Geography of Poverty project and, last month, spent time in the cold woods of Maine. This is heart-breaking work, the physical and mental isolation of our elders is hard to process. This work – what Roger May would, I think, call Heartwork – is […]

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Calming Ways and Sharp Eyes

Over at The New York Times Lens blog, David Gonzalez looks back at the first African-American woman to be a staff photographer there. Ruby Washington, a South Georgia native, died earlier this year. “The temperature would go down a couple of degrees because she had that nice, calming way and was nonthreatening with a ready […]

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We’ve Lost Marc Riboud

I don’t know when I first came across Marc Riboud’s work, but his book on China affected me deeply. It was a seemingly casual yet amazingly precise look at the country during a time when few had access to it. Riboud passed last week at the age of 93, Oliver Laurent at Time has a […]

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“I wanted to stop her crying”

It’s an image everyone is talking about, a little girl crying as her mother is searched by U.S. Border Patrol agents. It’s an image that took John Moore a decade to make. “I have no way of knowing if things will be okay.” Journalism matters.

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Visualizing Autism

I am going to put this right up front – I think Craig Walker may be one of the most important photojournalists of our time. He won earned two Pulitzer Prizes while at the Denver Post, one for a story on a kid joining the Army and a second on a Marine coming back from […]

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