Building a Sense of Place at Woodstock

The New York Times takes a look at the (ahem) three rolls of film Roger Ballen exposed at Woodstock, 50 years ago. This exchange alone makes it worh a read: You’ve said that so much of photography is actually rooted in having experiences and not just sitting behind a camera or computer. Yeah, this is […]

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20th Century Journalists

The Associated Press Images Blog has put up a collection of photos of AP photographers and reporters form throughout the 20th century – great fun to see how our roles and appearances have changed.

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Putting a Box Around the World

Ted Koppel did a piece centered on the Bronx Documentary Center that really looks at the lives of Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington and other photojournalists who have been killed while cover the world’s wars. Worth ten minutes of your time.

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Calming Ways and Sharp Eyes

Over at The New York Times Lens blog, David Gonzalez looks back at the first African-American woman to be a staff photographer there. Ruby Washington, a South Georgia native, died earlier this year. “The temperature would go down a couple of degrees because she had that nice, calming way and was nonthreatening with a ready […]

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“I wanted to stop her crying”

It’s an image everyone is talking about, a little girl crying as her mother is searched by U.S. Border Patrol agents. It’s an image that took John Moore a decade to make. “I have no way of knowing if things will be okay.” Journalism matters.

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Visualizing Autism

I am going to put this right up front – I think Craig Walker may be one of the most important photojournalists of our time. He won earned two Pulitzer Prizes while at the Denver Post, one for a story on a kid joining the Army and a second on a Marine coming back from […]

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The Hypocrisy of a Corporate Mandate Urging Independence

By now, you’ve seen the video montage that Deadspin created, with anchors from dozens of Sinclair Broadcasting Group stations reading the same corporate-issued script. You’ve seen the response from media associations like the National Press Photographers Association (and seen the consequences of that statement), you’ve read the analysis from folks like Al Tompkins at the […]

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The Ethics of Self-assigned Work

In a piece for the Poynter Institute from 2017, Kainaz Amaria talks about the moment she realized she wasn’t going to be a conflict photographer and the underrepresentation of women in photojournalism. But there’s one line in there, one line that I wish every student and young professional would pay attention to: It’s that I […]

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