The Hypocrisy of a Corporate Mandate Urging Independence

By now, you’ve seen the video montage that Deadspin created, with anchors from dozens of Sinclair Broadcasting Group stations reading the same corporate-issued script. You’ve seen the response from media associations like the National Press Photographers Association (and seen the consequences of that statement), you’ve read the analysis from folks like Al Tompkins at the […]

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Reading the World Press Photo FInalists

Michael Shaw has an interesting take on the six World Press Photo finalists over at Reading the Pictures. There is not one photo that begins a dialogue, that poses a question, that does anything other than hit us upside the head. The question of what’s the purpose of an image is a long, deep one. […]

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The Image, Deconstructed Workshop

High on my list of events I want to get to is The Image, Deconstructed Workshop out in Colorado: THE IMAGE, DECONSTRUCTED workshop is an immersive weekend photographic experience. Attendees are welcome from all skills levels. The workshop will be held at The Denver Post in downtown Denver, Colorado. Our faculty is comprised of award-winning […]

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Storytelling Lessons

My friend Al Tompkins at the Poynter Institute has broken down a couple of Super Bowl commercials to help us become better storytellers. Worth clicking through for the other ad breakdown.

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LOOK3 Festival Shuttered

Photo District News is reporting that the LOOK3 photo festival, held for the last decade or so in Charlottesville, will not continue due to financial issues. This was on my bucket list for a long time, the line up was always intriguing and the atmosphere, reportedly, amazing. But I’ve also heard there was minimal, if […]

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Getting the Big Picture, Leaving a Legacy

A wonderful piece by a gentleman whose work I admire and whose character I deeply respect – Billy Howard writes about making a group photo at a summer camp and becoming part of the camp’s legacy. Too often we drop into people’s lives, quickly assess what makes them who they are and then dash off. […]

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Personal Boundaries

The Deer Center for Journalism and Trauma interviewed nine female journalists about the issues they have faced in the field and how to deal with them. This should be required viewing for everyone who is a member of the media or who interacts with the media. So, essentially, everyone on the planet. (Thanks to alum […]

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Look Versus Feel

The New York Times’ Todd Heisler writes about covering tragic events like the church shooting in Texas. Because of this, it is important to make images that go beyond grief and crime scenes. Step back. Give a sense of place. Show not just what a scene looks like but, more important, what it feels like.  […]

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Knowing Your Sources Matters

Every journalism course will teach you the same thing – know who your source is and why they are talking to you. In today’s wired world, that same lesson needs to apply to photo editors as Jan A. Nicolas reports at PetaPixel, a fake war photographer (using stolen and modified images) manages to get work […]

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Pieces of Advice

Independent photojournalist Yunghi Kim, who has put a lot of effort into help educate others on good business and copyright practices, has assembled a nice collection of comments from ten women photojournalists. I love this from Jane Evelyn Atwood: I don’t like to be called a “female photographer”. We don’t refer to Salgado or Cartier-Bresson […]

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