Category Business & Industry

Automating the Copyright Infringement Search

Steven Melendez at FastCompany has an interesting piece up on two companies – Copypants and Pixsy – that are automating the search for copyright infringements online.

The technology (similar to Google’s and TinEye’s reverse image search) has the potential to be a powerful way to control how our images are used. The danger comes from how the process moves forward after finding a possible infringement – overly aggressive law firms could spur rollbacks of copyright protections in a worst-case scenario.

Now, if there were a way to get hosting platforms to tie into a reverse image search with the Copyright Office to stop the images from even getting posted, that could be a game changer – getting more people to register AND making potential infringers aware of what they are doing.

(Thanks to John Harrington for the link.)

When Assisting Means Employed

David Walker at Photo District News has taken a look at several legal issues related to large-scale photo shoots, ones where “assistants” are routinely hired to help with the production.

The common industry term “assistants” means something different in New York and California. Most of us think of assistants as independent contractors, paid a flat rate to work on a shoot. In two states, it means they are employees and have to be paid at the end of the day, with taxes taken out and have a workers’ comp and unemployment insurance in place.

That is a game changer for a lot of budgets. This is worth a close read.

Southwestern Photojournalism Conference Moves … East?

Yep, what has been in Texas for years is now in Nashville, Tennessee, February 15-17.

I’ve heard many great things about this event and, if I didn’t have a conflict, I would head there myself.

China’s 79-Year-Old Sports Photographer

Hong Nanli is my new sports photography hero and will be yours, too.

(Thanks to Mark Hertzberg for the link.)

LOOK3 Festival Shuttered

Photo District News is reporting that the LOOK3 photo festival, held for the last decade or so in Charlottesville, will not continue due to financial issues.

This was on my bucket list for a long time, the line up was always intriguing and the atmosphere, reportedly, amazing.

But I’ve also heard there was minimal, if any, discussion on the business of photography. Every venture has risks involved, markets move on from where you’ve staked your claim. The key is in making sure you’re able to survive those market moves.

Without a sound footing in the business of photography, you won’t succeed. I hope there’s something new that comes along, that the organizers take what they’ve learned and build a new program, one that will continue to be supported by the industry, that will draw in amazing storytellers and have them talk about how to both make the images and how to market the images in a sustainable way.

Maybe call it LOOK4Ward … to the rest of your career.

(Thanks to John Harrington for the lede.)

The Year in Pictures, Then and Now

Allen Murabayashi compares The New York Times’ 2008 and 2017 Year in Pictures presentations over at the PhotoShelter blog.

The differences in technical quality and how images are toned are substantial. The evolution of digital cameras I seen through greater resolution, dynamic range and low light sensitivity, but the way photographers are handling post-processing is really evident. Tools that were not available a decade ago now have a significant impact on the look of news photographs.

Visuals for Radio

My friend Regina McCombs posted a gallery of the work her staff and stringers did this year for Minnesota Public Radio – a gallery of stunning visuals.

Think about that – great visuals made for radio. What a wonderful world we live in.

Personal Boundaries

The Deer Center for Journalism and Trauma interviewed nine female journalists about the issues they have faced in the field and how to deal with them. This should be required viewing for everyone who is a member of the media or who interacts with the media.

So, essentially, everyone on the planet.

(Thanks to alum and friend of the program Minla Shields for the link.)

On Why Journalists Need Access

The Washington Post’s David Nakamura takes a look at the photo(s) posted by The New York Times’ Doug Mills of the presidents visit to Manila.

There is a lot to unpack here.

Avedon and Civil Rights

Interesting look at the way Richard Avedon was trying to get segments of the publishing industry to move forward during the Civil Rights era by Philip Gefter for The New York Times.