Visual Journalism Fellowships in the Bay Area

This is an interesting idea – CatchLight Local is coordinating three, three-month long visual fellowships in the San Francisco area for later this year. The fellows will partner with local newsrooms to help show the story of the community. (Application info and more details available at the link.) Research has shown that visual journalists have […]

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Starry, Starry Fakes

I may have a new hero – Dr. Elisabeth Bik, a microbiologist who has been looking at ethical issues in science journals, has turned her eye to some astrophotography published by National Geographic. One of the great losses of the last 20 years has been the relationships between photo editors and photographers. It used to […]

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Pop Stars and Copyright Theft

Seems like we’ve been down this road before … The National Press Photographers Association and 15 others organizations have sent a letter of protest to Ariana Grande’s management company over a copyright grad that’s inserted into their press coverage agreement.

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Putting a Box Around the World

Ted Koppel did a piece centered on the Bronx Documentary Center that really looks at the lives of Chris Hondros, Tim Hetherington and other photojournalists who have been killed while cover the world’s wars. Worth ten minutes of your time.

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Inside the Canon EOS R

Sometimes, I really want to take things apart … then I remember I would be responsible for putting them back together. Which makes me happy when Roger Cicala at LensRentals.com does it. They last camera I disassembled was an all-mechanical Nikon, things have changed.

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Photo Editing and Senate Hearings

Over at the Columbia Journalism Review, Darrel Frost takes a look at how last week’s supplemental Supreme Court hearings were handled visually. The dilemma is what can you or should you show in one frame when an event went on for more than that 1/250 of a second. My thinking has always been that you […]

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Calming Ways and Sharp Eyes

Over at The New York Times Lens blog, David Gonzalez looks back at the first African-American woman to be a staff photographer there. Ruby Washington, a South Georgia native, died earlier this year. “The temperature would go down a couple of degrees because she had that nice, calming way and was nonthreatening with a ready […]

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The Story Goes On, the Story Goes Out

There’s a tie between first responders and journalists – they’re the most likely to head towards trouble spots in communities. To be there, to bear witness, to document and explain so others can be informed or prepared, that’s what journalists do. When storms like Hurricane Florence hit, the best and worst of journalists comes out. […]

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We’ve Lost Marc Riboud

I don’t know when I first came across Marc Riboud’s work, but his book on China affected me deeply. It was a seemingly casual yet amazingly precise look at the country during a time when few had access to it. Riboud passed last week at the age of 93, Oliver Laurent at Time has a […]

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