Visuals at the Olympics

This is a look into how Getty Images handled images at the Olympics. I suspect it’s a little different than how we will handle them at the Paralympics … we won’t have the robotic cameras. And a few other things they have.

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Photo Editors Please, or At Least Visual Awareness (Updated)

It seems that I am on a multi-year rant about my local news organization. I pay my subscription, I read it every day online, spend time with the delivered Sunday edition and I truly appreciate that they are severely understaffed. That the depth of their coverage has suffered is sad and I do not find fault with the individual journalists – photojournalists, reporters and editors – for the stories they miss. That’s economics, that’s the result of poor judgement on the part of past managers.

What I do take issue with is the sloppiness of the editing, the lack of awareness of what they have published and their seeming inability to improve what they have through simple adjustments.

Like, perhaps, looking at the front page and seeing that an obituary story, that has now been on the front of their web site for more than a day, features a teaser photo of the woman’s chest. Not her face, as in the adjacent stories of men, but of her cleavage.

(And, for those who know me, yeah, it’s come to me talking about cleavage on this site. That’s how frustrating this is.)

I get that this is a wire service feed, that it is automated at some level. And, as with most other issues I have with the Athens Banner-Herald, I do not suspect any level of malice here.

In my classes, we talk about ethical transgressions of commission and omission. The former is an active attempt to deceive, think Jason Blair or Allan Dietrich. For whatever reason, they made a choice to lie because they did not care about their audience.

Transgressions of omission are, I suspect, much more common and more insidious. They come from failed processes, they come from a lack of awareness, they come from a lack of training. In the end, though, they again symbolize a lack of care.

Newsrooms are limited in their resources and need to make decisions about what to cover and what to publish. Part of that decision making process needs to ensure that what they do publish is both accurate and fair, that they have the resources to execute that coverage properly.

If you don’t have someone to monitor automated feeds, to at least check in once a few hours, then you need to decide if the risk of something going wrong is worth it. And here, my local news publication failed us.

Again.

UPDATE: After 34 hours, someone finally fixed the image. No note, no comment, just fixed it. Here’s what she looks like:

Momenta Scholarships

Some substantial scholarships and awards available for upcoming Momenta Workshops, worth looking into.

Hallmark Institute to Close

The Hallmark Institute in Massachusetts is set to close its doors in October. This is the second for-profit professional photography school to shutter in the last month, following the announcement that the Brooks Institute will close soon, too.

Why We Need Photo Editors, Olympic Second Edition

Chances that there was not a photo editor working on this page are pretty high. You can’t be an authority on anything if you can’t get facts right – and this is, at its core, a fact error.

(Thanks to Steve Fox for the link.)

The Value of Photo Editors, Olympic Edition

Allen Murabayashi has a nice analysis of image usage out of the Olympics – and why having an experienced photo editor makes a difference.

No ethical issues … this time.

Support the HPR

Something a little light for a Tuesday afternoon.

“Here at Hipster Photographer Rescue we give these kids options, and make them see that lurking self-consciously on street corners, wearing a messenger bag filled with old cameras, cigarettes, a James Joyce novel, organic cashews and a Macbook Pro, does not make you a professional photographer.

“Still, we can only detox, de-program and re-home so many of these little guys,” he sighed.

Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar – $50 for Students

Atlpj logo dates 2016 18c2afbeEgads … Nikon has signed on to sponsor student registrations for this year’s Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar – $50 gets you into everything. Both days, all sessions. That’s a crazy good deal.

The seminar is November 11 and 12 this year, get it on your calendar now.

GeekFest in DC

Looks like a great lineup at this year’s GeekFest in Washington, D.C. Get registered, folks.

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Getty Images Sued, Again

Can a photo agency license public domain works? That’s the question that will come up in a copyright claim case that Carol Highsmith is filing against Getty Images, claiming they have pulled images she holds the copyright to but put in the public domain (through the Library of Congress) and has been charging fees on.

Self portrait of photographer Carol M. Highsmith, via a broken mirror that she photographed during the Willard Hotel restoration. Washington, D.C.

Self portrait of photographer Carol M. Highsmith, via a broken mirror that she photographed during the Willard Hotel restoration. Washington, D.C.