Photographing Fashion

Nice behind the scenes look at what it’s like to cover the London Fashion Week over at CNN. Not quite as fun as it might seem.

Well, That Escalated … SanDisk Announces 1 TB Card

Yes, you read that headline right – SanDisk unveiled a prototype of a 1 TB – terabyte SDXC card at Photokina this week.

That’s … so frightening to me. To have so much data in one tiny card, it gives me palpitations just thinking about the risk of losing it.

Image Theft for Political Gain

Let the copyright violation season begin – though usually it’s not the high level candidates who do this.

CPOY Call for Entries

The call for entries for the College Photographer of the Year has been posted. Deadline is on Sunday, October 2, but don’t wait until the last minute.

The Making of A Photograph

Sam Abell talking about taking more than a year to make just one image, well worth a little bit of your day.

We Have Lost Marc Riboud

After a 60 year career, Marc Riboud passed in Paris on Tuesday at 93. A protege of Henri Cartier-Bresson, his quiet images of the ordinary within the extraordinary are marked by grace and a graphic elegance.

Visuals at the Olympics

This is a look into how Getty Images handled images at the Olympics. I suspect it’s a little different than how we will handle them at the Paralympics … we won’t have the robotic cameras. And a few other things they have.

Screen Shot 2016 08 24 at 10 11 44 AM

Photo Editors Please, or At Least Visual Awareness (Updated)

It seems that I am on a multi-year rant about my local news organization. I pay my subscription, I read it every day online, spend time with the delivered Sunday edition and I truly appreciate that they are severely understaffed. That the depth of their coverage has suffered is sad and I do not find fault with the individual journalists – photojournalists, reporters and editors – for the stories they miss. That’s economics, that’s the result of poor judgement on the part of past managers.

What I do take issue with is the sloppiness of the editing, the lack of awareness of what they have published and their seeming inability to improve what they have through simple adjustments.

Like, perhaps, looking at the front page and seeing that an obituary story, that has now been on the front of their web site for more than a day, features a teaser photo of the woman’s chest. Not her face, as in the adjacent stories of men, but of her cleavage.

(And, for those who know me, yeah, it’s come to me talking about cleavage on this site. That’s how frustrating this is.)

I get that this is a wire service feed, that it is automated at some level. And, as with most other issues I have with the Athens Banner-Herald, I do not suspect any level of malice here.

In my classes, we talk about ethical transgressions of commission and omission. The former is an active attempt to deceive, think Jason Blair or Allan Dietrich. For whatever reason, they made a choice to lie because they did not care about their audience.

Transgressions of omission are, I suspect, much more common and more insidious. They come from failed processes, they come from a lack of awareness, they come from a lack of training. In the end, though, they again symbolize a lack of care.

Newsrooms are limited in their resources and need to make decisions about what to cover and what to publish. Part of that decision making process needs to ensure that what they do publish is both accurate and fair, that they have the resources to execute that coverage properly.

If you don’t have someone to monitor automated feeds, to at least check in once a few hours, then you need to decide if the risk of something going wrong is worth it. And here, my local news publication failed us.

Again.

UPDATE: After 34 hours, someone finally fixed the image. No note, no comment, just fixed it. Here’s what she looks like:

Momenta Scholarships

Some substantial scholarships and awards available for upcoming Momenta Workshops, worth looking into.

Hallmark Institute to Close

The Hallmark Institute in Massachusetts is set to close its doors in October. This is the second for-profit professional photography school to shutter in the last month, following the announcement that the Brooks Institute will close soon, too.