Category Good Work

Photographing A Candidate

A great look inside the work done by The New York Times’ Damon Winter during the presidential campaign.

I know that I can never explain the day’s news the way our writers do, but what I can do is help the reader feel what it is like to be there and to make pictures that have meaning beyond the objects in the frame.

My role is not to make the candidate look good or make the crowds look impressive. My job is to tell the story.

NPPA Awards

Been inspired by someone? Perhaps they deserve recognition from the National Press Photographers Association.

The Lost Rolls

In my home office, there are filing cabinets and boxes full of processed film. Tens of thousands of frames, made over a span of 20 years, waiting to be seen again. But that pales in comparison to the volume of images stored on hard drives, to those stored in the cloud and burned to DVDs and CDs over the last decade and a half.

Rattling around in the back of my mind is the same question every photojournalist asks themselves – will anyone ever see this work again?

But my situation is different from what Ron Haviv found himself in – with a couple hundred rolls of film that he had never even gotten around to processing, shot around the world. Now, he’s turned those images into The Lost Rolls book.

Photojournalist Ron Haviv in “The Lost Rolls” – NOWNESS from NOWNESS on Vimeo.

I can’t order this … I have too many books and too many pictures to look through … damn it.

One Little Hammer

This short video of Randy Olson talking about his work … whoa.

Especially this line:

If I don’t go somewhere and find something that’s unexpected, then I’m not doing my job. If you can Google what I’m finding out, then everybody already knows about it.

One Little Hammer: Randy Olson from Blue Chalk on Vimeo.

The Making of A Photograph

Sam Abell talking about taking more than a year to make just one image, well worth a little bit of your day.

We Have Lost Marc Riboud

After a 60 year career, Marc Riboud passed in Paris on Tuesday at 93. A protege of Henri Cartier-Bresson, his quiet images of the ordinary within the extraordinary are marked by grace and a graphic elegance.

Grace and Power

I suspect there will be a lot of discussions in my classes about Jonathan Bachman’s image of two Baton Rouge police officers approaching a woman to arrest her. Allen Murabayashi has a nice compilation of commentary over at PhotoShelter, a good starting point.

The Moments in Between

Anderson Cooper did a segment for 60 Minutes on music photographer Danny Clinch.

His phrasing about looking for the moments in between, I concur that’s where the magic happens. Miss growing out of mouths are just not that interesting, but when someone gets lost in her music … that’s the moment.

Also, how cool is it that 60 Minutes is doing segments on photographers?

Photographing What You’re Interested In

This is an interesting video where Lee Friedlander talks about how his projects come together. And that wording is precise – he and the other panelists talk about the process of making images and then looking to see what you’re making images of and from that deciding if there’s a project.

Friedlander says, “I don’t know what I’m interested in until I see it.”

Fascinating look at the process.

How Photographing Objects Leads to People

One of the great challenges in photojournalism is being told to photograph a thing. It may be a building or a bridge or a birdcage, but, chances are, unless you have the ability to light the daylights out of it, it’s going to be static.

And static isn’t great for news photographs. My mantra has always been we tell stories through people. Someone lived or worked in the building, someone built the bridge, someone put a bird in the birdcage – that’s there the story comes in.

So stumbling across this Alec Soth piece about being asked to photograph the oldest living tree in the world and how that grew into tying into aging made me smile.

That photo of Lloyd sitting on a picnic bench? Man, does that resonate with me. It speaks about the costs of survival, the will to continue on …