Category Good Work

Gordon Parks, Back to Fort Scott

This was posted two years ago, but it’s still worth putting in a little time: A collection of images Gordon Parks made for Life magazine about segregation.

It’s about both access and understanding the story you’re trying to tell, both are needed to succeed.

Dorothe Lange’s Internment Camp Images

In 1942, Dorothea Lange was hired to document the collection and internment of Japanese-Americans. The images she made, owned by the government, were considered not suitable for publication and impounded, lost in the National Archives until 2006.

Now, Anchor Editions has collected a bunch of them together, some of which you can order prints of for your own wall.

Whether you buy a print for your wall or not is irrelevant, look at the story being told her. Powerful images.

What’s Important Is the Next Picture

Nice, short interview with Bruce Davidson at Time’s Lightbox blog where he talks about his 1959 photographs of a Brooklyn gang.

Want to get images this intimate? Follow this advice:

I was close and I stayed longer.

Worth sticking through the pre-roll ad.

Arbus, Avedon and Winogrand Images in Atlanta

This is on my list of things to get to … the High Museum of Art in Atlanta has an exhibit of work from Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon and Garry Winogrand up through February 26.

Castro In Photographs

The morning brought news that Fidel Castro had died at the age of 90. A click to The New York Times brought me to this video that has some of the amazing work that Jack Manning did during a short trip to Cuba in 1964. Even if you turn the sound down (which I don’t recommend you do, as Richard Eder’s story is fascinating), the images are a text book example of how to document a person within their place and time. 

Peter Turnley Print Sale

If you were looking for a gift for your favorite professor or decided this was the time to invest in artwork, head over to Peter Turnley’s print sale

There’s a lyrical sense to his work that I have loved for decades. Yeah, they are expensive, but this is another revenue stream for wonderful documentary work. And #12 is just such a wonderful moment …

Photographing A Candidate

A great look inside the work done by The New York Times’ Damon Winter during the presidential campaign.

I know that I can never explain the day’s news the way our writers do, but what I can do is help the reader feel what it is like to be there and to make pictures that have meaning beyond the objects in the frame.

My role is not to make the candidate look good or make the crowds look impressive. My job is to tell the story.

NPPA Awards

Been inspired by someone? Perhaps they deserve recognition from the National Press Photographers Association.

The Lost Rolls

In my home office, there are filing cabinets and boxes full of processed film. Tens of thousands of frames, made over a span of 20 years, waiting to be seen again. But that pales in comparison to the volume of images stored on hard drives, to those stored in the cloud and burned to DVDs and CDs over the last decade and a half.

Rattling around in the back of my mind is the same question every photojournalist asks themselves – will anyone ever see this work again?

But my situation is different from what Ron Haviv found himself in – with a couple hundred rolls of film that he had never even gotten around to processing, shot around the world. Now, he’s turned those images into The Lost Rolls book.

Photojournalist Ron Haviv in “The Lost Rolls” – NOWNESS from NOWNESS on Vimeo.

I can’t order this … I have too many books and too many pictures to look through … damn it.

One Little Hammer

This short video of Randy Olson talking about his work … whoa.

Especially this line:

If I don’t go somewhere and find something that’s unexpected, then I’m not doing my job. If you can Google what I’m finding out, then everybody already knows about it.

One Little Hammer: Randy Olson from Blue Chalk on Vimeo.