Category Good Work

Finding Tereska

Tereska life magazine spreadOne of the somewhat lesser-known founders of the Magnum Photos collective is also one of my favorites, David Chim Seymour. Carole Naggar at Time takes a look at the search to find one of the kids from his 1948 story on how millions of children had survived World War II.

These follow-up stories (like the search for the Afghan girl years ago) are just fascinating to me. Intellectually, we know the people we document existed before and after the moment they were photographed. Emotionally, we tend to take that one moment in time as representative of their lives and that’s a dangerous thing.

Getting Found on Instagram

Is Instagram a viable way of getting found? Elisabeth Sulis Gear at FeaturesShoot talked with six photo editors to learn how they use the social media photo platform to research photographers.

Young Documentary Photographers

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Great piece at The New York Times’ Lens blog on a Bronx Documentary Center project that has kids telling stories about their own lives. Much for us, as journalists, to learn from looking at their work and listening to the way they talk about stories.

POSTPONED: Daniel Berehulak to Receive the McGill Medal for Journalistic Courage

NOTE: This has been postponed, once we have updated info I’ll post it here.

Happy to announce that photojournalist Daniel Berehulak will receive the University of Georgia’s Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication’s McGill Medal for Journalistic Courage at a ceremony here in Athens on Monday, April 10.

Come join us if you can, reception to follow the presentation.

Looking Back, Look Ahead

This was posted last year, but it seems like a good time to review the story behind John Filo’s Pulitzer Prize winning photo of the deaths at Kent State in 1970. This is one of the most comprehensive looks at his actions and reactions, worth the time here.

It’s alarming to read some of this now, that Filo and others were afraid that people would deny the killings of students by National Guard soldiers had happened, that it would be, to use a modern phrase, sold as fake news.

Filo continued to photograph other people’s reactions to the body, angering some students. They yelled: “Why are you doing this?” and “What kind of pig are you, taking pictures of this?” Filo says he yelled back: “No one is going to believe this happened!”

The note he received after winning the Pulitzer Prize is an testament to the role of journalism, that story telling is not a singular goal but a lifetime effort. That note, from fellow Pulitzer Prize winner Eddie Adams, said simply, “Dear John, You have my deepest congratulations. Hold your head up high. Now, let’s see what you can do tomorrow.”

(Thanks to Katy Culver at the University of Wisconsin for the lead.)

Good Work: Richard Sandler

A nice collection of images at Time’s Lightbox by Richard Sandler who does street photography in the northeast. Really love the light in the last two images in the gallery.

The Woman Behind the Saturday Night Live Photographs

I kind of want to work for Mary Ellen Matthews now …

160 Years of The New York Times Front Pages

This is just awesome:

Every front page of The New York Times – watch the way it changes over time put together by Josh Begley.

(Thanks to DL Cade at PetaPixel for the link.)

Gordon Parks, Back to Fort Scott

This was posted two years ago, but it’s still worth putting in a little time: A collection of images Gordon Parks made for Life magazine about segregation.

It’s about both access and understanding the story you’re trying to tell, both are needed to succeed.

Dorothe Lange’s Internment Camp Images

In 1942, Dorothea Lange was hired to document the collection and internment of Japanese-Americans. The images she made, owned by the government, were considered not suitable for publication and impounded, lost in the National Archives until 2006.

Now, Anchor Editions has collected a bunch of them together, some of which you can order prints of for your own wall.

Whether you buy a print for your wall or not is irrelevant, look at the story being told her. Powerful images.