Category Good Work

Looking Back, Look Ahead

This was posted last year, but it seems like a good time to review the story behind John Filo’s Pulitzer Prize winning photo of the deaths at Kent State in 1970. This is one of the most comprehensive looks at his actions and reactions, worth the time here.

It’s alarming to read some of this now, that Filo and others were afraid that people would deny the killings of students by National Guard soldiers had happened, that it would be, to use a modern phrase, sold as fake news.

Filo continued to photograph other people’s reactions to the body, angering some students. They yelled: “Why are you doing this?” and “What kind of pig are you, taking pictures of this?” Filo says he yelled back: “No one is going to believe this happened!”

The note he received after winning the Pulitzer Prize is an testament to the role of journalism, that story telling is not a singular goal but a lifetime effort. That note, from fellow Pulitzer Prize winner Eddie Adams, said simply, “Dear John, You have my deepest congratulations. Hold your head up high. Now, let’s see what you can do tomorrow.”

(Thanks to Katy Culver at the University of Wisconsin for the lead.)

Good Work: Richard Sandler

A nice collection of images at Time’s Lightbox by Richard Sandler who does street photography in the northeast. Really love the light in the last two images in the gallery.

The Woman Behind the Saturday Night Live Photographs

I kind of want to work for Mary Ellen Matthews now …

160 Years of The New York Times Front Pages

This is just awesome:

Every front page of The New York Times – watch the way it changes over time put together by Josh Begley.

(Thanks to DL Cade at PetaPixel for the link.)

Gordon Parks, Back to Fort Scott

This was posted two years ago, but it’s still worth putting in a little time: A collection of images Gordon Parks made for Life magazine about segregation.

It’s about both access and understanding the story you’re trying to tell, both are needed to succeed.

Dorothe Lange’s Internment Camp Images

In 1942, Dorothea Lange was hired to document the collection and internment of Japanese-Americans. The images she made, owned by the government, were considered not suitable for publication and impounded, lost in the National Archives until 2006.

Now, Anchor Editions has collected a bunch of them together, some of which you can order prints of for your own wall.

Whether you buy a print for your wall or not is irrelevant, look at the story being told her. Powerful images.

What’s Important Is the Next Picture

Nice, short interview with Bruce Davidson at Time’s Lightbox blog where he talks about his 1959 photographs of a Brooklyn gang.

Want to get images this intimate? Follow this advice:

I was close and I stayed longer.

Worth sticking through the pre-roll ad.

Arbus, Avedon and Winogrand Images in Atlanta

This is on my list of things to get to … the High Museum of Art in Atlanta has an exhibit of work from Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon and Garry Winogrand up through February 26.

Castro In Photographs

The morning brought news that Fidel Castro had died at the age of 90. A click to The New York Times brought me to this video that has some of the amazing work that Jack Manning did during a short trip to Cuba in 1964. Even if you turn the sound down (which I don’t recommend you do, as Richard Eder’s story is fascinating), the images are a text book example of how to document a person within their place and time. 

Peter Turnley Print Sale

If you were looking for a gift for your favorite professor or decided this was the time to invest in artwork, head over to Peter Turnley’s print sale

There’s a lyrical sense to his work that I have loved for decades. Yeah, they are expensive, but this is another revenue stream for wonderful documentary work. And #12 is just such a wonderful moment …