Category Business & Industry

On Why Journalists Need Access

The Washington Post’s David Nakamura takes a look at the photo(s) posted by The New York Times’ Doug Mills of the presidents visit to Manila.

There is a lot to unpack here.

Avedon and Civil Rights

Interesting look at the way Richard Avedon was trying to get segments of the publishing industry to move forward during the Civil Rights era by Philip Gefter for The New York Times.

The History of Vivian Maier

Vivian Maier took the photographic community by storm several years ago, long after she had produced an astounding body of work.   Now, researcher Ann Marks has shared some of what she has learned with the Associated Press, shedding new light on Maude’s work

(Thanks to Susan Walsh for the lead.)

Woman At War


There were not a lot of women combat photographers in Vietnam (or most other conflicts), one of the best was Catherine Leroy and Elizabeth Herman has part of her story up at The New York Times’ Lens blog.

Many consider Ms. Leroy as the most daring of all photographers in Vietnam, and she most likely spent the most time in combat because she needed the money. Being broke meant traveling with soldiers, sharing rations and sleeping in the countryside.

Her’s is an amazing story, worth the time.

Why You Stick to Your Workflow

As soon as I can after a shoot, I download my cards and back up the images into at least two places. Why? I am paranoid.

When I travel, I download and email or upload the best images to an online service, just in case something goes wrong. I teach my students this same thing.

A New York City photographer may want to evaluate his backup system – keeping the original cards and the hard drive used to back them up together can cause you some severe problems.


Reuters Launches Grant Program for Students

Reuters has developed a grant program to help photojournalists and photojournalism students advance their skills and tell stories that need to be told. There will be up to eight grants, each up to $5,000. The results of the projects will be distributed via Reuters’ photo service, as well.

Start writing. Deadline to apply is December 10.

Pieces of Advice

Independent photojournalist Yunghi Kim, who has put a lot of effort into help educate others on good business and copyright practices, has assembled a nice collection of comments from ten women photojournalists.

I love this from Jane Evelyn Atwood:

I don’t like to be called a “female photographer”. We don’t refer to Salgado or Cartier-Bresson as “male photographers”. I feel that calling us “female photographers” perpetuates the idea that we are “lesser than”, in some way. It defines us by gender rather than by the quality of our pictures.

The term “female photographer” is sexist.

All of the women in this piece are worth studying.

The Unthreatened Give

Buried in this nice piece by Eric Minton on photographer Stephen Green is this brilliant quote about mentoring:

The most talented are the most giving; they are unthreatened, and they want you to get it right.

It’s true. As an educator, I bring photojournalists and editors in to my classroom and workshop spaces all the time. How I choose them isn’t a mystery – I choose them because I trust they will give back.

Visual journalism is a continuum, it existed before we started and it will exist after we leave. I tell my kids that knowledge isn’t theirs and the pros who get to work with my kids understand that.

(Thanks to Mark Hertzberg for the link.)

Women in Photojournalism

This, to me is a must- and first-read on the topic: Andrea Billups look at Women in Photojournalism, Opportunities and Independence.

Why we still have this conversation in 2017 is beyond me, but we will keep having it until there’s no longer a need.

Auto Photo Business

If you’ve spent more than four minutes with me, you know one of my passions lies deep in the automotive realm. Old cars, new cars, broken cars and the old, new and broken people that go with them – I love being a part of those stories.

So it should come as no surprise that I tend to look at a lot of car photos and read a lot about the people who also love cars. Amy Shore has been taking the automobile photo world by storm of late and she’s put together a very long, very detailed post on what you need to know to get into the business. Really, even if you never want to photograph a car, the processes she talks about apply to you, too.

You can have a crap photographer with the best camera on the market and they’ll create high-quality crap photos. Or you can have a fabulous photographer only shooting with their mobile phone and get more Instagram followers than you or I will ever have because their ‘eye’ for an image is amazing.

It is well worth a good chunk of your weekend.

She was also profiled on the Mercedes-Benz site, which concludes with a short video of her.