Category At Work

The History of Vivian Maier

Vivian Maier took the photographic community by storm several years ago, long after she had produced an astounding body of work.   Now, researcher Ann Marks has shared some of what she has learned with the Associated Press, shedding new light on Maude’s work

(Thanks to Susan Walsh for the lead.)

Woman At War


There were not a lot of women combat photographers in Vietnam (or most other conflicts), one of the best was Catherine Leroy and Elizabeth Herman has part of her story up at The New York Times’ Lens blog.

Many consider Ms. Leroy as the most daring of all photographers in Vietnam, and she most likely spent the most time in combat because she needed the money. Being broke meant traveling with soldiers, sharing rations and sleeping in the countryside.

Her’s is an amazing story, worth the time.

Why You Stick to Your Workflow

As soon as I can after a shoot, I download my cards and back up the images into at least two places. Why? I am paranoid.

When I travel, I download and email or upload the best images to an online service, just in case something goes wrong. I teach my students this same thing.

A New York City photographer may want to evaluate his backup system – keeping the original cards and the hard drive used to back them up together can cause you some severe problems.


Reuters Launches Grant Program for Students

Reuters has developed a grant program to help photojournalists and photojournalism students advance their skills and tell stories that need to be told. There will be up to eight grants, each up to $5,000. The results of the projects will be distributed via Reuters’ photo service, as well.

Start writing. Deadline to apply is December 10.

Pieces of Advice

Independent photojournalist Yunghi Kim, who has put a lot of effort into help educate others on good business and copyright practices, has assembled a nice collection of comments from ten women photojournalists.

I love this from Jane Evelyn Atwood:

I don’t like to be called a “female photographer”. We don’t refer to Salgado or Cartier-Bresson as “male photographers”. I feel that calling us “female photographers” perpetuates the idea that we are “lesser than”, in some way. It defines us by gender rather than by the quality of our pictures.

The term “female photographer” is sexist.

All of the women in this piece are worth studying.

A Little Larceny

I love this idea from J. Scott Applewhite:

Little stolen moments, some of my best pictures have a little larceny in them.

Scott Applewhite: Lifetime Achievement Award from The Associated Press on Vimeo.

Finding Tereska

Tereska life magazine spreadOne of the somewhat lesser-known founders of the Magnum Photos collective is also one of my favorites, David Chim Seymour. Carole Naggar at Time takes a look at the search to find one of the kids from his 1948 story on how millions of children had survived World War II.

These follow-up stories (like the search for the Afghan girl years ago) are just fascinating to me. Intellectually, we know the people we document existed before and after the moment they were photographed. Emotionally, we tend to take that one moment in time as representative of their lives and that’s a dangerous thing.

Getting Found on Instagram

Is Instagram a viable way of getting found? Elisabeth Sulis Gear at FeaturesShoot talked with six photo editors to learn how they use the social media photo platform to research photographers.

Young Documentary Photographers

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Great piece at The New York Times’ Lens blog on a Bronx Documentary Center project that has kids telling stories about their own lives. Much for us, as journalists, to learn from looking at their work and listening to the way they talk about stories.

Good Work: Richard Sandler

A nice collection of images at Time’s Lightbox by Richard Sandler who does street photography in the northeast. Really love the light in the last two images in the gallery.