Your final portfolio is due on the server by 5 p.m. on Friday, May 6. That is an absolute deadline – at 5 p.m., I take the server offline. Please do not tempt fate on that day – get your portfolio in early.

Your portfolio is ten images that were made this semester, fully captioned, cropped and appropriately toned. They should show a variety of image types (long, medium, closeup, portrait, news, feature, etc.) to demonstrate the competencies you have mastered. Look for great light, good moments, clean compositions and storytelling.

You may have packages of 2-3 photos from the same subject (each image will be considered as one image), but those photos need to work as a package.

You may have images from your multimedia project but they cannot be the same or substantially similar.

Additionally, the redo for your multimedia project will be included with the portfolio. 

To submit, create a folder titled LastName_portfolio and inside that put your ten images and the final version of your multimedia project.

Things to watch out for …

  • Not saving files as true JPGs
  • Errors on your captions
  • Not properly naming your images
  • Not having ten images
  • Turning in images that are not sharp
  • Turning in images that are not properly exposed
  • Turning in a multimedia project that was not exported properly

The lab will be open Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Questions? As always, send them along.

For your final assignment, you need to produce an audio slideshow that is 90-120 seconds in length. This assignment should bring everything you have learned together in one portfolio quality story.

Every image should be technically flawless – sharp, properly exposed and with good color rendering. Every image should be exceptionally well controlled – a dynamic composition with great background and edge control. And every image should add some level of knowledge to the viewer’s understanding.

The audio should be clean (think carefully about where you interview) and have some natural sounds layered in.

Schedule going forward:

  • Monday, April 18: Inspiration presentations
  • Wednesday, April 20: Inspiration presentations
  • Monday, April 25: Work day, I’ll be in the lab to help answer questions
  • Wednesday, April 27: Work day, I’ll be in the lab to help answer questions
  • Friday, April 29: Deadline for multimedia project is 4 p.m., on the server as usual
  • Monday, May 2: Review stories and wrap up

On the tutorials page there is a video for Building Audio Slideshows in Premiere as well as a PDF handout – study those carefully.

Questions? Send them along.

April 18 and 20 is when you’ll be teaching the class, be prepared on that Monday – we will draw names for the order so you could go on either day. Your presentation should run approximately 5-7 minutes.

We have PowerPoint and Keynote set up in the lab or you can use a web-based presentation tool from Google or others. My thoughts on Prezi … maybe you can be the first person to use it well. Maybe.

Your classmates will critique your session in the areas of research, presentation and usefulness.

  • How deep is your knowledge, does it go well beyond a wikipedia-style talk? What sources have you rooted through? (While you don’t need to turn in those sources, referencing them in your talk is never a bad idea.)
  • How is your presentation structured? Does it let us understand who inspires you, why they inspire you and what impact they have had on the communities they cover or our industry?
  • Have you built a narrative through your presentation? Does the order of information make sense?
  • Does the visual style of the presentation reflect the work being discussed? Are there typos, improper punctuation, fact errors or bad formatting in the presentation?
  • What’s the takeaway for the audience? How can they apply what you’ve shared to their work? Are there compositional/technical tips to share? How they work with their subjects? How their work is displayed or shared? Ways for everyone to learn more?

Be prepared for questions, know more than you talk about – that’s a key teaching tip.

Questions? Send them along.

Due on the server by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 8, is a news package of three to five images. The images can come from either a calendared news event or be related to an ongoing issue in the community.

The focus here is on news – not entertainment, not sports, not features. News. The event or issue needs to be something the community must know about.

You should be reading the local news publications (the Athens Banner-Herald, the Red & Black) and listening to local news media (WUGA) to know what’s happening in the community, that will help inform you and guide you to a newsworthy topic.

As always, send along questions.

Two feature photos, due on the server by 4 p.m. on Friday, April 1.

Look for a great moment, a telling slice-of-life image that speaks to what living, studying or working on the UGA campus or surrounding area is like. This is to be a found moment – meaning it’s not from a scheduled or regularly occurring event. This is why you carry your camera everywhere, waiting for those little moments that makes us feel our world a little more.

Light matters: use a different type of light in each photo (hard, soft or, perhaps, diffused). Moments matter, relationships matter, story matters.

I promised you more on Dave LaBelle, so here are all of the videos on him that Francis Gardler did:

Wait until you get to Chapter 2 … powerful stuff.

Now that you’ve fallen for him (everyone does, it’s okay to admit it), head over to order your own copy of The Great Picture Hunt 2. It truly is the greatest community journalism book.

April 18 and 20 is when you’ll be teaching the class, be prepared on that Monday – we will draw names for the order so you could go on either day. Your presentation should run approximately 8-10 minutes. You must email me by 6 p.m. on Monday, March 21, with who you will be profiling, this is to prevent us from having duplicates.

We have PowerPoint and Keynote set up in the lab or you can use a web-based presentation tool from Google or others. I have thoughts on Prezi … maybe you can be the first person to use it well. Maybe.

Your classmates will critique your session in the areas of research, presentation and usefulness.

  • How deep is your knowledge, does it go well beyond a wikipedia-style talk? What sources have you rooted through? (While you don’t need to turn in those sources, referencing them in your talk is never a bad idea.)
  • How is your presentation structured? Does it let us understand who inspires you, why they inspire you and what impact they have had on the communities they cover or our industry?
  • Have you built a narrative through your presentation? Does the order of information make sense?
  • Does the visual style of the presentation reflect the work being discussed? Are there typos, improper punctuation, fact errors or bad formatting in the presentation?
  • What’s the takeaway for the audience? How can they apply what you’ve shared to their work? Are there compositional/technical tips to share? How they work with their subjects? How their work is displayed or shared? Ways for everyone to learn more?

Be prepared for questions, know more than you talk about – that’s a key teaching tip.

Questions? Send them along.

This is an interstitial type assignment. You need to practice recording and editing audio.

For the recording, watch the Audio Recording tutorial to get started. Then, listen for a story you can tell with no words – just natural sounds. Listen for five to ten elements that you can piece together to make a story.

Then, go ahead and edit the audio. Again, watch the Audio Editing tutorial to get started. The tutorial is based on using Audacity, which is a free program available for both Windows and Macintosh operating systems. Make sure you get the LAME MP3 Encoder under the Optional Downloads section and connect them through the preferences in Audacity.

You can use Garage Band, Audition or Pro Tools if you have/have access to them – just make sure you know how to use them and can export the final piece as an MP3 file. That MP3 files needs to be emailed to me by 6 p.m. on Sunday, March 20 – I’ll pull them all together and we’ll listen in class on Monday.

Don’t overthink this, just find some (non-coffee, non-shaving) sound story. Have a little fun with it.

Want to get really geeky? Check this out …

Here’s that interview with Scott Strazzante I mentioned, worth reading to get his take on the impact of Common Ground on both the audience but him, as well. And here’s the Facebook group where he’s posting some new diptychs again.

A portrait, completely controlled, of someone we should know about on campus. SHOW US something about them, tell their story, in a single frame. Due on the server by 4 p.m. on Friday, March 4. Think about light and color, think about place.

Some tips …

  • Choose your subject carefully. Make sure there is something visual that you can include – this is an environmental portrait, one where we should see what someone looks like and why we need to know about them in the same frame.
  • You control this – you’re in charge of when and where this is shot, what’s in the frame and what’s not. How they pose, which way they look, what they wear, the angle you shoot from – all of those are your responsibility.
  • Think carefully about light – quality, as we discussed in class, as well as quantity. I can’t stress this enough – don’t add unnecessary challenges by choosing someone who does not exist in good light. What’s the right light? What’s the right mood to establish the story?
  • Give yourself enough time – be honest with them when setting this up, you’re slow with the camera. Heisler can get it shot in 10-15 minutes, you’re going to need more. And shoot a lot – different angles, different focal lengths. Move around, experiment – take what you learned from the effects of focal length from the Depth of Field and 36 Faces assignments and apply it here.
  • Don’t wait. Start now.

(Don’t forget that you need a complete caption.)

Here’s the Heisler video we didn’t get to:

Maine Media Interview with Gregory Heisler from Maine Media Workshops + College on Vimeo.

Heisler made several references to Arnold Newman, so here’s an interview with him:

Look at the way light wraps and slices through and hides in his frames.

Some more info on portraits …

Steve McCurry talking about them on his blog.

Jane Bown’s obituary contained some of her work and her approach to it.

And, for fun, here’s a look at a portrait project on roller derby athletes.

Due on the server by 4 p.m. on Friday, March 18, are four photos for your Places2Faces assignment.

  • The first photo should establish the location of your story – what does it look like? color? texture? geography? architecture?
  • The second photo should establish a face that is central to your story – who lives/works/exists here? what do they look like? how does the place show in their face?
  • The third photo should fill the place with some faces – interior? movement? uses of the space? how full? empty?
  • The fourth photo should show your face in the place – shift the focus. how do faces interact with the place? how do the faces reflect the place? the place the face?

All four images need complete captions – including all identifying information, contact info and in complete sentences. You can crop and tone these as appropriate, as well.

If you want another presentation on this assignment, take a look at this piece I wrote for PBS on how we use this assignment. May give you some more background or ideas.

Questions, comments or concerns? Send them along.